Core garden chores

CORE DANGER/SAFETY FACTS OF FIRES IN VEGETATION:
• the more dense the vegetation, the more intense the fire.
• the more intense the fire, the more radiant heat, flames & ember shower
• the more radiant heat, flames & embers, the more danger to lives and homes.

CORE ACTION TO TAKE TO INCREASE SAFETY

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Paths between vegetation and walls protect cladding from flames, and windows from radiant heat (Picture (c) Katherine Seppings)

• Have paths between house-walls and plants.
• Thin out clutter
. Have spaces between garden beds.
• Replace flammable mulch with granitic sand, pebbles, or road-metal crushings.
• Populate garden beds with low flammability plants, succulents and vegetables.
• Replace rough barked eucalypts with smooth-barked.
• Replace highly flammable native plants with fire resistant species e.g. European deciduous
• Plant dense-canopied European deciduous trees on the firewind side of buildings.
• European deciduous trees absorb sparks and embers and can protect roof and walls.
• Thoughtful planning, preparation, and regular maintenance saves homes and lives.

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Fine leaves + high flammability. Radiant from these shrubs would crack windows. (Picture (c) Katherine Seppings.)

FLAMMABITY FACTS
• Bushfire can’t burn what you’ve cut back.
• It can’t burn bare earth or gravel paths.
• It can’t ignite trees if there’s nothing growing under them.
• Fire resistant plants in your garden increase your bushfire safety.

NATIVE GARDENS – THOUGHTS TO PONDER
• A politically correct native garden is an easily burned garden.
• A ‘native’ garden does not keep your property ‘natural’. It keeps it endangered.
• Introduced species of plants should not be scorned. They keep homes safer.
• We are an introduced species. Our lifestyle is not ‘native’.
• Our houses are not ‘native’.
• Our livestock, our pets are introduced species.
• Roads and cars are introduced species of danger to the environment.

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